TCBA Yearbook

1978

  INDEX

Seasons

1921  1922  1923
1924  1925  1926 1927  1928  1929

1930  1931  1932
1933  1934  1935 1936  1937  1938
1939

1940  1941  1942
1943  1944  1945 1946  1947  1948
1949

1950  1951  1952
1953  1954  1955 1956  1957  1958
1959

1960  1961  1962
1963  1964  1965 1966  1967  1968
1969

1970  1971  1972
1973  1974  1975 1976  1977  1978
1979

1980  1981  1982
1983  1984  1985 1986  1987  1988
 1989 

1990  1991  1992
1993  1994  1995 1996  1997  1998
1999

2000  2001  2002
2003  2004  2005 2006  2007  2008
 2009 

2010  2011  2012
2013  2014  2015 2016  2017  2018
  2019  

Miscellaneous
Foreword 1
Foreword II
Introduction
The Ad
The Letter
The Test
First Newsletter
Yesterday
Gold
TCBA Almanac

Eastern

 

 

Western

 

 

Greylock

98

64

...

Rockford

113

49

...

Sterling

98

64

...

Long Island

98

64

15

Hyde Park

85

73

11

Harbor Beach

82

80

31

San Francisco

86

76

12

Evanston

77

85

36

Connecticut

60

102

38

Rolling Meadow

74

88

39

Northeast

56

106

42

Bradenton

59

102

33

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Central

 

 

 

Bergen

102

59

...

Shiloh

95

67

7.5

Norfolk

85

77

18

Meadowlands

77

85

26

Morgantown

73

89

30

Ruskin

72

90

31

Santa Barbara

43

119

60

 

Dan Warren -      Jim McEneaney’s wildcard Long Islanders knocked off Stu McCorkindale’s Barflies. Eastern Division champ (on a tie breaker) Greylock topped Rockford and the Islanders en route to not only the AL Championship, but also a victory over the Manchester Whalers to gain the TCBA Championship.

     Shiloh’s Rod Carew turned in the league’s first .400 season, a spectacular .437, far outclassing Pete Rose’s .376. San Francisco’s George Foster set  league records with 62 home runs and 170 RBI.

     There were eight 20-game winners, despite the batting heroics. Steve Carlton (29), Jim Palmer (26), Phil Niekro (23), Rick Reuschel (22), John Candelaria (20), Mike Torrez (20), Dennis Leonard (20), and Frank Tanana (20). Norfolk’s Jim Rooker tossed a no-hitter against Bradenton.

     Another familiar name joined the managerial ranks, as Larry Smith’s Mimosa Mirth Makers replaced Bob Moore’s Shiloh Spurs. Marty Fiehl started a couple of years’ sabbatical, Bob Braun bemoaned his 1975 trade of Carlton Fisk for George Mitterwald, and Bob Wood bragged about getting Foster from Greylock.

     Stu McCorkindale acquired Ron Guidry for $104,000. Pitcher Mark Lemongello (who received  8 bids???) went for $106,000 to Harbor Beach (ed. note: so Dick Gorney wasn’t perfect after all!); and Eddie Murray for $111,000 to Connecticut. On the other hand, Dennis Martinez, still active in 1995, went to Ruskin for $33,000. Frank Tedeschi paid $13,000 for somebody  named Thormodsgard. (ed. note: We told you he wasn’t qualified!)

 Jim McEneaney - Buoyed by trade acquisitions Bill Buckner, Lyman Bostock, Mickey Rivers, Ted Sizemore, and Gary Lavelle, and rookie outfielder Andre Dawson, the Isles emerged from the ashes of the previous season's cellar-dwelling finish to capture a wildcard berth in their first full season of existence.  In their very first playoff series, Long Island rallied from a 3-0 game deficit to stun Bergen in the AL semi-finals before bowing out in 7 games to the Greylock Gators.

 Fiehl Facts - League founder Jim Lafargue defects to the American League to start off the season.  Mr. Lafargue made some comment about wanting to get to know the AL managers better.  I sure hope he wasn’t disappointed.

 Bob Braun -

AINSPAN

     I first became aware of Marty Fiehl during our first year in TCBA, when I was a long-haired hippie in the Health Food store, and Marty was a skinny 19-year old kid. He wrote me a letter in that dreadful handwriting of his; pencil scrawled on yellow paper. A charter member of TCBA, he guessed that I might be a Mets fan; took a chance - and made a friend for life. From that simple beginning has developed a special friendship, on e that has gone beyond the basic boundaries of baseball.

     My daughter Sarah was six months old when we traveled to Binghamton for my first visit to Fiehl-dom, meeting Mother Fiehl, and Frank Tedeschi. Marty had this rubber alligator named Ainspan, his team mascot, that he gave to Sarah. She took to it right away, loving to chew on Ainspan’s long green tail. Somehow that alligator survived Sarah (now a college student) and a cyclone named David (a first round draft choice in 1981). Ainspan’s got a broken jaw and a bobbed tail now, but his spirit is alive and well. Ainspan is a very special name in our family mythology, and both of my children have grown to appreciate the generosity and delightful humor that is Marty Fiehl.

     The paths of fate that brought Marty and I together were well marked by founder Jim Lafargue. TCBA has evolved far beyond its original purpose; far beyond our ability to comprehend. It continues to be a memorable experience, creating complex, lifelong friendships out of a simple game called baseball.

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 Ainspan in Silhouette

 

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